Health & wellness

Healthy neighborhoods support healthy habits. Here are some ways the Mayor’s Office is promoting health and wellness.
Tucson Moves a Million Miles logo

Tucson Moves a Million Miles
(actually, 1,150,824 miles so far!)

Sign up for Tucson Moves a Million Miles and reach your personal fitness goals as part of a community. Together, Tucsonans are logging millions of miles of physical activity. How far is one million miles? Four times the distance from the earth to the moon!

April is Tucson Fitness Month Try out some free fitness classes Free fitness classes courtesy of participating organizations and sponsors and the Tucson Mayor's Office

Tucson Fitness Month

Tucson Fitness Month offers a month of free fitness classes and activites, introducing hundreds of Tucsonans to new ways to get active and fit. Started by the mayor in 2015, the program relies on participating organizations and sponsors. In 2017, the month kicks off April 2nd with a celebration at Cyclovia. For a calendar of fitness classes and activities, click here.

Announcing the Bring Back the Splash program, March 2012

Announcing the Bring Back the Splash program, March 2012

Bring Back the Splash

Starting in 2012, public/private partnerships made it possible for the City of Tucson to reopen a number of closed city swimming pools. City pools are an important resource—where families can cool off and children can learn to swim. For sponsorship information, visit the Tucson Parks Foundation website.

K-6 Fitness Day at Sierra 2-8 School, November 2014

K-6 Fitness Day at Sierra 2-8 School, November 2014

K-6 Fitness Day

Launched in November 2013, K-6 Fitness Day promotes physical activity for elementary school students in all local school districts.

Commission on Food Security, Heritage and Economy

In 2015, the City Council created the Commission on Food Security, Heritage and Economy. Staffed by the Mayor’s Office, its focus is access to healthy food, local food production and distribution.

Interested in growing your own fruits and vegetables? Visit Community Gardens of Tucson for a community garden near you.

Bike and pedestrian safety

The City of Tucson secured more than $4.5 million from the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) and more than $1 million from the U.S. Department of Transportation for projects that increase safety as well as recreation and commuting options for Tucson cyclists and pedestrians.

Walk to School Day with Blenman Elementary School students and Safe Routes to School, October 2014

Walk to School Day with Blenman Elementary School students and Safe Routes to School, October 2014

Funds will go toward:

  • Four HAWK crossings at busy arterial streets
  • Three bike boulevards—low volume, low stress neighborhood streets optimized for biking
  • The Arroyo Chico Greenway, a multi-use path that connects Reid Park with downtown
  • A portion of the Loop on Tucson’s east side, a pedestrian and bike beltway that links to other communities (administered by Pima County)
  • Tucson’s Safe Routes to School program
  • Safety improvements to city streets on the University of Arizona campus
  • A plan to improve handicapped and pedestrian access throughout the city

For bike maps and more, visit the City of Tucson’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Program.

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