The Five T’s

The Five T’s of Tucson’s economy: Technology, Trade, Transportation, Tourism and Teaching

Mayor Rothschild has focused on Tucson’s many advantages in working to spur economic growth.

At Sargent Controls & Aerospace, February 2014

At Sargent Controls & Aerospace, February 2014

Technology

Home to a growing number of tech industry clusters—in aerospace & defense, bioscience, IT, manufacturing, mining, optics and solar—as well as the University of Arizona, a major research institution, Tucson has the workforce and resources to support high-tech manufacturing.

Our location puts us at the heart of the Arizona-Sonora Binational Megaregion—giving companies the flexibility of prototyping and production here and in Northern Mexico.

With Nogales, Sonora Mayor Ramón Guzmán at Mayor Rothschild's Borderlands Trade Conference, May 2014

With Nogales, Sonora Mayor Ramón Guzmán at Mayor Rothschild’s Borderlands Trade Conference, May 2014

Trade

Mayor Rothschild has made repeated trips to Sonora, Sinaloa and Mexico City to promote trade and to undo the damage done by misguided policies like SB 1070, which the City of Tucson fought against in court.

He has also focused on export assistance to Tucson businesses, holding a Borderlands Trade Conference in 2014 that was attended by business and government representatives from the U.S. and Mexico, and opening trade offices in Hermosillo, Ciudad Obregón and Mexico City.

His work is having results. In 2014, Arizona exports to Mexico were up 22.2%, to more than $8.6 billion. That same year, Mayor Rothschild was presented with the Ohtli Award, the Mexican government’s highest award to non-citizens.

The Port of Tucson, October 2012

The Port of Tucson, October 2012

Transportation

Tucson offers international connections by rail, interstate and air, making it a logistics hub. The nearest major U.S. city to the seaport in Guaymas, Sonora, Tucson also offers access to seaports in Los Angeles and San Diego through the inland Port of Tucson, which provides international, intermodal shipping.

The convergence of I-10, I-19 and the Union Pacific railway system, as well as Tucson’s proximity to the border—just 66 miles from Mexico and the Mariposa Port of Entry—make Tucson a natural choice for U.S. companies doing business in Mexico, and Mexican companies doing business in the U.S.

With AGTA CEO Doug Hucker and vendors at the AGTA GemFair, February 2013

With AGTA CEO Doug Hucker and vendors at the AGTA GemFair, February 2013

Tourism

Tucson attracts visitors from as far as Europe and Asia and as near as Phoenix and Mexico.

Mayor Rothschild has worked with local festivals, organizers and Visit Tucson to extend our tourist season with some new offerings—a “best of” film festival in October, Tucson Festival of Film, and the Tucson Jazz Festival in January.

And, by resolving longstanding disputes with Rio Nuevo, Mayor Rothschild freed up funds to make improvements to the Tucson Convention Center and attract more events.

Students at the Pima Community College Aviation Technology Program, July 2012

Students at the Pima Community College Aviation Technology Program, July 2012

Teaching

Strong schools mean a strong economy—part of the reason for Mayor Rothschild’s focus on education.

K-12, community college, university, or trade school, Tucson is home to many outstanding schools and teachers. Mayor Rothschild has worked to bring them funding and help, creating GED and certification testing scholarships and recruiting volunteers to work with struggling readers in grades K-3.

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