Environment

The City of Tucson has long been a leader in preparing for climate change and drought, with the result that Tucson has greater water security today than many other Western cities.

Recharging the millionth acre-foot of CAP water at Tucson Water's Clearwater Renewable Resource Facility, March 2013

Recharging the millionth acre-foot of CAP water at Tucson Water’s Clearwater Renewable Resource Facility, March 2013

 

Water agreement with Phoenix

In October 2014, Tucson entered into a water agreement with Phoenix that increases water security and decreases costs for both cities. Under the terms of the agreement, Phoenix stores some of its CAP allocation in Tucson’s well field. If a shortage was declared, Tucson would pump and use that water and Phoenix would use some of Tucson’s CAP allocation. Read more…

10K trees logoMayor’s 10,000 Trees Campaign

Trees beautify neighborhoods and cool the air, lowering utility costs. Yet Tucson has been losing trees faster than we replace them.

Planting the 10,000th tree at Oyama Elementary School, September 2014

Planting the 10,000th tree at Oyama Elementary School, September 2014

To reverse that trend, Mayor Rothschild launched his 10,000 Trees Campaign in October 2013. With help from Trees for Tucson, its sponsors, and many individual Tucsonans, we reached our initial goal—but there’s still work to be done! Help plant another 10,000 native and desert-adapted trees. Read more…

 

Energy Efficiency Slide

Mayor’s Energy Efficiency Workshop for Businesses

In March 2015, Mayor Rothschild held an Energy Efficiency Workshop for local businesses with Tucson Electric Power and Tucson Water. Savings on utility bills can be put toward business expansion and job creation, which a number of businesses have done. Both TEP and Tucson Water offer rebates and other programs to help businesses save on utility bills.

Green vehicles, green streets, green buildings

In 2006, the City of Tucson adopted LEED® Silver standards for all new city-owned buildings and renovations over 5,000 square feet. Fire Station #22 was our first building to earn LEED® Gold certification, in 2008. (For more on LEED® Certification, click here.)

City of Tucson Environmental Services' CNG-powered collection trucks, June 2013

City of Tucson Environmental Services’ CNG-powered collection trucks, June 2013

In 2014, the Mayor’s Office worked with nonprofit Watershed Management Group to pass a green streets policy, directing the Tucson Department of Transportation to use stormwater to irrigate trees and other vegetation in medians and roadsides on new and reconstructed city streets, using features such as curb cuts.

And the city’s Environmental Services Department is in the process of converting its trash and recycling collection fleet to run on compressed natural gas (CNG)—saving on fuel and maintenance costs while reducing the city’s carbon footprint.